Mindful Metropolis March 2010 : Page 24

living healthy | from your local farmer Dr. A. Tereau Pearson Holistic Dental and Wellness Center provides a full range of dental services for the entire family in a calm eco-friendly spa environment. In addition to receiving excellent care in a holistic, biocompatible, fully integrative setting, we also direct special attention and detail to creating a beautiful smile and face. Additional services include • Biocranial therapy • Craniosacral therapy • Reiki • Facial peels • Detox procedures • Nutritional coaching • Homeopathics • Non-surgical gum therapy • Structural orthodontics • Invisialign® • Hawaiian medicinals, herbs and products Merit to the Carrot By terra Brockman W Holistic Dental and Wellness Center 1964 W. Dempster, Evanston, IL • 847-332-1406 Call us about our homeopathic alternative to flu/virus vaccinations. hile cold March winds still blow, it’s hard to believe the fi rst greens of spring are just around the corner. Soon wild ramps will perfume the moist woodlands with their pungent aroma, the perennial sorrel and rhubarb will unfurl their leaves, and spears of green garlic will thrust through the straw mulch to greet the sun…but not quite yet. While we anticipate those fi rst greens, there are still many wonderful warm- ing root vegetables to enjoy—on their own, or combined in soups and stews. One of my favorite roots on this cusp of the seasons is the carrot—par- ticularly large, fl avorful “storage carrots”—made into soups, or braised with white wine and fi nished with butter, salt, pepper, and a sprinkling of parsley. Any way you prepare them, carrots have plenty of merit—taste, nutri- tion, versatility, and the ability to keep in pristine condition for up to nine months. It’s no wonder that the carrot is a perfect “winter keeper.” As a biennial, it grows from a tiny seed to a large plant with a nutrient-dense root in its fi rst year, and the second year utilizes the energy stored in its root to fl ower and make seeds. To get from year one to year two, the plant enters dormancy. It is this ability to go into suspended animation that makes carrots excellent vegetables for long-term storage—their bulky, nutrition-packed root designed to last through even the longest winter. tabbouleh with grated carrot » 2 cups boiling water » 1 cup coarse bulgur » ¼ tsp salt » 1/2 cup olive oil » 1/2 teaspoon sea salt » 1/4 cup lemon juice 24 march 2010

From Your Local Farmer

Terra Brockman

While cold March winds still blow, it’s hard to believe the first greens of spring are just around the corner. Soon wild ramps will perfume the moist woodlands with their pungent aroma, the perennial sorrel and rhubarb will unfurl their leaves, and spears of green garlic will thrust through the straw mulch to greet the sun…but not quite yet.<br /> <br /> While we anticipate those first greens, there are still many wonderful warming root vegetables to enjoy—on their own, or combined in soups and stews.<br /> <br /> One of my favorite roots on this cusp of the seasons is the carrot—particularly large, flavorful “storage carrots”—made into soups, or braised with white wine and finished with butter, salt, pepper, and a sprinkling of parsley.<br /> <br /> Any way you prepare them, carrots have plenty of merit—taste, nutrition, versatility, and the ability to keep in pristine condition for up to nine months. It’s no wonder that the carrot is a perfect “winter keeper.” As a biennial, it grows from a tiny seed to a large plant with a nutrient-dense root in its first year, and the second year utilizes the energy stored in its root to flower and make seeds. To get from year one to year two, the plant enters dormancy. It is this ability to go into suspended animation that makes carrots excellent vegetables for long-term storage—their bulky, nutrition-packed root designed to last through even the longest winter.<br /> <br /> tabbouleh with grated carrot <br /> » 2 cups boiling water <br /> » 1 cup coarse bulgur <br /> » ¼ tsp salt <br /> » 1/2 cup olive oil <br /> » 1/2 teaspoon sea salt <br /> » 1/4 cup lemon juice<br /> <br /> »»2 bunches green onions, diced <br /> »»4 carrots, grated <br /> »»1 cup fresh parsley, chopped<br /> <br /> Put bulgur and salt in a bowl, and pour boiling water in. Cover and let stand until tender, 20-30 minutes. Meanwhile, combine olive oil, sea salt, lemon juice, green onions, carrots and parsley in a large bowl. Drain bulgur in a sieve, pressing to remove excess liquid. Toss bulgur with vegetables and serve.<br /> <br /> Sweet Braised Carrots with Fresh Herbs<br /> <br /> »»1 pound carrots <br /> »»1 cup vegetable or chicken broth <br /> »»1 teaspoon honey <br /> »»1 tablespoon butter <br /> »»2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped (or use one tablespoon dried)<br /> <br /> Scrub and peel carrots. Cut into disks or 2-inch lengths. In a medium saucepan, bring broth to a boil. Add carrots, honey, butter and parsley.<br /> <br /> Cover and simmer for 4 to 5 minutes. Remove carrots to a warm plate and reduce liquid to a light glaze by continuing to simmer for 15 to 20 minutes longer. Return carrots to pan and toss in the thickened liquid.<br /> <br /> Terra Brockman is author of The Seasons on Henry’s Farm, available at terrabrockman.com. She is also founder of The Land Connection, a nonprofit dedicated to preserving farmland, training new farmers and connecting consumers with local food. Visit thelandconnection.org to learn more.

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