Mindful Metropolis October 2011 : Page 31

art & soul | reviews BooKS The World Peace Diet Will Tuttle, Ph.D. (Lantern Books) This is not your average 350 page, recycled mate-rial book written by a die-hard vegan. Dr. Will Tut-tle’s bestseller, The World Peace Diet, examines in detail the many pitfalls of our past, present and fu-ture consumption habits and reliance on animal products, and how they negatively impact all life forms on Earth. A thorough and consci-entious probing of historical, medical, philo-sophical, scientific, spiritual and ethical data is offered up to the reader with a focus on the centralized theme of interconnectedness. Tut-tle’s book may be a bit “heavy,” but the ultimate message is a positive one, advocating for the benefits of our shared planet’s human inhabit-ants adopting a more vegan diet and lifestyle. Tuttle tours the nation with his wife, spread-ing his compassionate messages of positive —regina m. torreS change and hope. ’90s that young activists, who had never set foot in the woods, took deforestation person-ally. Learn more at ifatreefalls.com . —Sawyer j. lahr 9000 Needles Bigfoot Entertainment (Director: Doug Dearth) It takes more than 9000 acupuncture needles to restore partial mobil-ity to stroke victim Devin Dearth. The 40-year-old CEO and Mr. Kentucky middleweight bodybuild-er suffers a bleed in his brain stem, paralyzing his right side. Devin’s brother Doug ( Grace is Gone, War Inc. ) documents his family’s journey through Devin’s ongoing recovery. Though Devin’s living will requested he not remain on life support, his wife, Stacy, is undecided up until Devin starts responding again. Rushed through rehab, he is discharged when insurance runs out. Once Devin returns home and the burden of 24/7 care becomes unbearable, Doug presents Eastern alterna-tive medicine. Western preconceptions of acu-puncture dissipate when the family chats with stroke survivor, Ruth Lycke, who recovered at a highly esteemed clinic in Tianjin, China. With help from a benefit at their local First Baptist Church, $20,000 later, the proof of acupunc-ture’s effectiveness comes from witnessing its incredible healing power. Attend the Mindful-—Sjl Live! screening Oct. 27. the tabla player/producer’s more introspect side. Longtime Kale collaborator and vocal-ist Vishal Vaid contributes another new song, “Mehsoos (Feel),” brilliantly pacing a perfectly aligned flow. A classic of this circuit, Adham Shaikh’s dark “Gayatri Mantra” remains one of the best electro-kirtana tracks around, while Zeb’s pulsing “Bauls of New York” could elicit the ecstasy of entasy. More usual yoga sus-pects like Deva Premal and Jai Uttal are re-mixed, furthering the electronic evolution of yoga-themed tunes, while gorgeous offerings by Tuvan throat singers Huun Huur Tu and a hypnotic closing cut by MJ Greenmountain and Yossi Fine round out this debut collection certain to stimulate your appetite for flow. —dereK BereS Sevara Tortadur (Sevaramusic) Shedding a record label and the beats that underscored the Uzbek folk songs on her first two internationally released albums, Yol Bolsin and Sevara Nazarkhan’s third effort is truly charming. Unlike Uzbek star Yulduz Usmanova, who transforms her culture’s music into sugary and syrupy pop songs, Sevara travels back to 15th century maqams. This means singing through tea saucers, an old Uzbek tradition that does nothing to remove the luster of her beautiful vocals on “Yovvoi Tanovar.” The entire album is an all-star affair of cultural counterparts, featuring astounding performances by sonic geniuses on the frame drum, doira, the traditional nai flute and one of the most beautiful stringed instruments in existence, the doutar. Sevara exhibits such ease when surrounded by the simplest of soundscapes; her vocals grace the sheen of a simple rhythm and dancingly plucked melodies—the qonun player, Abdurakhmon Holtojiev, is brilliant throughout. Sevara’s is a voice and music that elicits the response, “Who is this?” from many unsuspecting friends. As she matures musically, many will know the answer. —dB MINDFULMetroPoLIS.coM film If A Tree Falls Oscilloscope Laboratories (Director: Marshall Curry) So goes the adage, “one man’s terrorist is an-other man’s freedom fighter.” 2005 Acad-emy Award nominee Marshall Curry ( Racing Dreams, Street Fight ) drums up empathy for political underdog Michael McGowan of the Earth Liberation Front. Curry captures Mc-Gowan after his 2005 arrest, reflecting on the actions that grew too big too fast. Most active in the ’90s, the ELF staged guerilla “actions” against loggers and supposed GMO tree farm-ers. McGowan was known as “the disgruntled one,” as documentarian Tim Lewis remem-bers, because he was dissatisfied with slow legislative progress. Since the environmental movement split into respective peaceful and militant factions, it has suffered a poor reputa-tion in the news media. While there was never a death toll from any of the arsons, the anony-mous members were branded as eco-terror-ists. Images of police brutality toward peaceful demonstrators were so horrifying in the late mUSiC DJ Fabian Alsultany Yoga Lounge (Black Swan) Of the many places that the widely circum-spect genre of music created for yoga finds ears, Globesonic founder and DJ Fabian Al-sultany caresses the cochlea with his first asana-themed compilation. Pulling a dozen tracks from his extensive list of international music contacts, Karsh Kale offers an origi-nal, “Shedding Skin,” elegantly exhibiting 31

Reviews

BooKS The World Peace Diet <br /> Will Tuttle, Ph.D. <br /> (Lantern Books)<br /> <br /> This is not your average 350 page, recycled material book written by a diehard vegan. Dr. Will Tuttle's bestseller, The World Peace Diet, examines in detail the many pitfalls of our past, present and future consumption habits and reliance on animal products, and how they negatively impact all life forms on Earth. A thorough and conscientious probing of historical, medical, philosophical, scientific, spiritual and ethical data is offered up to the reader with a focus on the centralized theme of interconnectedness. Tuttle's book may be a bit "heavy," but the ultimate message is a positive one, advocating for the benefits of our shared planet's human inhabitants adopting a more vegan diet and lifestyle. Tuttle tours the nation with his wife, spreading his compassionate messages of positive change and hope. -regina m. torreS<br /> <br /> film <br /> <br /> If A Tree Falls <br /> Oscilloscope Laboratories <br /> (Director: Marshall Curry) <br /> <br /> So goes the adage, "one man's terrorist is another man's freedom fighter." 2005 Academy Award nominee Marshall Curry (Racing Dreams, Street Fight) drums up empathy for political underdog Michael McGowan of the Earth Liberation Front. Curry captures Mc- Gowan after his 2005 arrest, reflecting on the actions that grew too big too fast. Most active in the '90s, the ELF staged guerilla "actions" against loggers and supposed GMO tree farmers. McGowan was known as "the disgruntled one," as documentarian Tim Lewis remembers, because he was dissatisfied with slow legislative progress. Since the environmental movement split into respective peaceful and militant factions, it has suffered a poor reputation in the news media. While there was never a death toll from any of the arsons, the anonymous members were branded as eco-terrorists. Images of police brutality toward peaceful demonstrators were so horrifying in the late '90s that young activists, who had never set foot in the woods, took deforestation personally. Learn more at ifatreefalls.com. -Sawyer j. lahr<br /> <br /> 9000 Needles<br /> <br /> Bigfoot Entertainment <br /> (Director: Doug Dearth) <br /> <br /> It takes more than 9000 acupuncture needles to restore partial mobility to stroke victim Devin Dearth. The 40-year-old CEO and Mr. Kentucky middleweight bodybuilder suffers a bleed in his brain stem, paralyzing his right side. Devin's brother Doug (Grace is Gone, War Inc.) documents his family's journey through Devin's ongoing recovery. Though Devin's living will requested he not remain on life support, his wife, Stacy, is undecided up until Devin starts responding again. Rushed through rehab, he is discharged when insurance runs out. Once Devin returns home and the burden of 24/7 care becomes unbearable, Doug presents Eastern alternative medicine. Western preconceptions of acupuncture dissipate when the family chats with stroke survivor, Ruth Lycke, who recovered at a highly esteemed clinic in Tianjin, China. With help from a benefit at their local First Baptist Church, $20,000 later, the proof of acupuncture's effectiveness comes from witnessing its incredible healing power. Attend the Mindful- Live! Screening Oct. 27. -Sjl<br /> <br /> mUSiC<br /> <br /> DJ Fabian Alsultany <br /> Yoga Lounge (Black Swan) <br /> <br /> Of the many places that the widely circumspect genre of music created for yoga finds ears, Globesonic founder and DJ Fabian Alsultany caresses the cochlea with his first asana-themed compilation. Pulling a dozen tracks from his extensive list of international music contacts, Karsh Kale offers an original, "Shedding Skin," elegantly exhibiting the tabla player/producer's more introspect side. Longtime Kale collaborator and vocalist Vishal Vaid contributes another new song, "Mehsoos (Feel)," brilliantly pacing a perfectly aligned flow. A classic of this circuit, Adham Shaikh's dark "Gayatri Mantra" remains one of the best electro-kirtana tracks around, while Zeb's pulsing "Bauls of New York" could elicit the ecstasy of entasy. More usual yoga suspects like Deva Premal and Jai Uttal are remixed, furthering the electronic evolution of yoga-themed tunes, while gorgeous offerings by Tuvan throat singers Huun Huur Tu and a hypnotic closing cut by MJ Greenmountain and Yossi Fine round out this debut collection certain to stimulate your appetite for flow.-dereK BereS <br /> <br /> Sevara <br /> <br /> Tortadur (Sevaramusic)<br /> <br /> Shedding a record label and the beats that underscored the Uzbek folk songs on her first two internationally released albums, Yol Bolsin and Sevara Nazarkhan's third effort is truly charming. Unlike Uzbek star Yulduz Usmanova, who transforms her culture's music into sugary and syrupy pop songs, Sevara travels back to 15th century maqams. This means singing through tea saucers, an old Uzbek tradition that does nothing to remove the luster of her beautiful vocals on "Yovvoi Tanovar." The entire album is an all-star affair of cultural counterparts, featuring astounding performances by sonic geniuses on the frame drum, doira, the traditional nai flute and one of the most beautiful stringed instruments in existence, the doutar. Sevara exhibits such ease when surrounded by the simplest of soundscapes; her vocals grace the sheen of a simple rhythm and dancingly plucked melodies-the qonun player, Abdurakhmon Holtojiev, is brilliant throughout. Sevara's is a voice and music that elicits the response, "Who is this?" From many unsuspecting friends. As she matures musically, many will know the answer. - DB

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